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One Voice Amongst Many – Lilia D’Acres Remarkable Journey ...

By Lara-Sophie Boleslawsky Photo Courtesy of Lilia D’Acres It was completely unplanned. Soft rays of sunlight were filtering through the windows of the Dunbar Community Centre and the lobby found itself filled with a diverse group of women, all of whom continue to be avid participants of the Vancouver Arts Colloquium Society’s Creative Weaving Workshop. Perhaps through some form of Fate, her deft hands always intervening in life, I soon found myself meeting and conversing with local author, Lilia D’Acres. The setting was loud, as women continued to weave and talk amongst themselves, and small children roamed the room, crashing and playing with any items their surroundings seemed to proffer, and yet it seemed our conversation never wavered, never warbled, never faltered. What struck me most about Lilia was the care and craft she took in deliberating and delivering her answers. We seemed to be forming a narrative through our dialogue, worthy of being written in ink. Passions seemed to erupt, as we touched on the power of English literature, the tasks and troubles of the writer and a few of Lilia’s ongoing projects.  Before composing her first book, Lilia taught writing and literature classes to many diverse groups of individuals. While happy to be fostering such supple minds, Lilia mused, “I didn’t get the chance to write.” This realization spurred her movement towards writing books, and eventually she transitioned from the classroom into this new creative venture. Her first work, described as “onerous” by Lilia, chronicles the building and development of Vancouver’s most iconic landmark. Entitled, Lions Gate, the non-fiction piece delves into the stories behind this bridge; following multiple threads of thought, the book soon becomes a beautiful tapestry of Vancouver history. In Lions Gate, Lilia explores issues and themes such as the...

Event Listings

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Kerrisdale Playbook ReCollection Jan11

Kerrisdale Playbook ReCollection...

Copies of “The Limited Edition” are now available for $10 each.  You can now reserve your copy by calling 604-257-8100 or email to hondakeiko@gmail.com, and pick up at the Kerrisdale Community Centre reception desk during 2016. First-Come, First-Served!   Acknowledgements    “Three years on a stone (will make a stone warm)” is the Japanese proverb meaning that perseverance will win out in the end. THE KERRISDALE PLAYBOOK RE-COLLECTION is the celebration of cultural transformation with our last full four years of continuous convivial “conversation” with the community. In this limited edition, we have selected 16 articles out of over 150, which represent a unique expression of the life force coursing throughout our community. Acknowledgments almost always begin by saying there are countless people to thank. This is particularly true this time. I want to thank all of the people, the interviewees, and readers over the past four years who have contributed to the Kerrisdale Playbook for great conversations. They have all inspired me. In particular though, I want to thank my team comprised of the 30 devoted young and the young-at-heart over the last four years. They all have brought their wholehearted work and created a new culture – the equivalent of what Barbara Ehrenreich would call – “Dancing in the Streets.” The new culture is symbolically a collection of community stories that evoke joy and exuberance in taking time to appreciate what’s around us, finding connections with people and nature, and expressing creativity in everyday life. Each and every article has offered a genuine, life-affirming and community-engaging conversation that allows us to find joy in the other fellow. Bravo to the team and what a pleasure to work with all of you! Of course I want to thank the Kerrisdale Community Centre Society...

Crossing that Bridge

  By Amy Cheng Photos: Noriko Nasu-Tidball     With different paces of life and activities, it is far too common for different generations to live in their own so-called “separate lives,” even if they were living together. Grandparents who are usually alone during the day may feel detached from their grandchildren who are more likely to spend their time online than to interact face-to-face with their family members.    This has greatly limited our opportunities in nurturing cross-age connections and understanding. We would hope to think that the issue of a generational gap is not as prevalent. And yet, many of our activities are divided by age group, more so than ever before. How many of us have actually taken steps to consciously narrow the gap?   Vancouver Arts Colloquium Society (VACS) is taking the lead to address the growing gap by launching“Intergenerational Creativity” Project, federally funded and supported by many community organizations including our very own Kerrisdale Community Centre (KCC). This project has been created to promote mutual understanding and respect across generations through art-driven activities, and to flesh out the varying gifts and resources that both the young and the old can give one another.   On May 1st, 2015, the project officially launched its kick-off event at KCC as a pilot site where we were joined by people of all ages and background. I have been recruited to this project as youth member and I have to say, it was extremely heartwarming to see everyone seated together and genuinely shared their passion and vision about ways to transcend the limitations society has place upon us. And eager participants, such as myself, could only relished and warmed up to the many inspirations and ideas that filled the room to the brim. ...

A Modern Day Bard: An Interview with Kevin Spenst...

By Lauren MacFarland     It’s not too common to meet a poet in today’s world, but Kevin Spenst is proving that this form of the written word won’t be dying off anytime soon. It started when he was five, pretending to write and putting the pen to page that started him down the path to authorship. “I grew up with a schizophrenic father, so there were a lot of question marks all over my life, and I think I was trying to find some sort of answer, decipher the uncertainties of my world.” These uncertainties led him to explore religion for some years, before he began meandering through the arts at the age of sixteen. Kevin developed skills in different mediums before settling on poetry around seven years ago. When Kevin moved to Vancouver, he was encouraged to audition and participate in theatre, getting roles in professional productions which let him fall into the world of film and television, collaborating with a group to create short films. While writing these scripts, Kevin found his niche. “I really liked the fact that I could just write a story every day, which is what I started.” It’s no small feat to commit to a daily output, but Kevin held himself to his work and found the traction he needed to develop his craft as a writer. “I’d wanted to write since I was a kid but I’d never found the right circumstances and the support of these people in Vancouver kind of gave me that encouragement to set up on my own and set up my own website.” His website is a collection of poems, drawings, prose, all lending to the growth of his own personal voice. “It was fun to write in this short,...

Rachelle Chartrand Turns her Demons into a Dark and Delicious Diary...

 By Katja De Bock Photo Courtesy of Rachelle Chartrand   When Rachelle Chartrand was performing yoga at her sister’s home in Beaumont, Alberta shortly before her 39th birthday in 2011, she had a vision of herself turning into a butterfly.   “It was about a week before my 39th birthday and all babies born in 1972 dreaded turning 40 and I was like ‘Bring it on’,” says Chartrand, who at the time came out of two hard years after a divorce.   She instantly understood this as a chance to finally turn from a scared little girl into a woman.   Chartrand decided to write down her journey and publish it as a book. But she wanted to be honest, without sugarcoating, after having felt like a fraud most of her life. A life that included an early loss of virginity, bulimia, alcoholism and two broken marriages. Her goal at the time: Making 2012 the best year of her life.   Fast forward two years and here’s Chartrand today, a beautiful woman radiant with the joy of her achievement.   Chrysalis is not your typical Sunday-afternoon, cozy-corner memoir that can be easily consumed with tea and cookies. Chrysalis can be fascinating if you like raw, honest dialogue and a no-nonsense attitude. Even though Chartrand says she did not write the book as a form of therapy, it touches on methods such as Emotion Freedom Technique and Emotion Code, as these are practices she used to come to terms with her past.   Chartrand does not mince words in some passages of Chrysalis when reminiscing her loss of virginity at a young age, the inability to speak with someone about this shocking event and the resulting mental pain she suffered throughout her adult relationships with...

Weaving Together a History...

By Haley Cameron  Photos: Noriko Nasu-Tidball   When Wendy Sparrow first began to learn Salish weaving, her sister, Debra, wasn’t particularly interested. “At that point I was into my own jewellery design,” explains the striking Musqueam woman with a commanding yet nurturing presence that inspires instant respect.   Fast forward a few decades and Debra, perhaps best known for her design of Team Canada’s 2010 Olympic jerseys, is a celebrated weaver whose reputed projects are just as practically functional as they are powerfully artistic. But above all else her work is historical.   It was ultimately a longing for history that inspired the two sisters to pursue Salish design. They were lost, Debra explains, and yet inspired to learn their purpose. “In order to know ourselves we had to know our own histories,” she says eloquently, her sentences flowing like carefully structured prose. “It was never about becoming an artist but rather becoming who we truly are.” The two abandoned their “little girl toys” of drugs and alcohol in order to listen for direction from their ancestors.   For Debra, that internal search quickly led to a curiosity for design. Sparrow, whose brother is the current Musqueam chief, is careful to explain that “art” per se does not exist in Musqueam culture. “Everything made is made to be used,” she outlines, describing how even the most ornate and decorative creations had a purpose in ceremonial practices. Her own interpretation is not that art doesn’t exist, but rather that “everything is art.”   “Growing up we were only really exposed to Northern design styles,” Debra says, explaining that the history they did know was never presented visually. “We grew up hearing it but not seeing it,” she continues, noting that while she knew the iconography...

I Call it ‘The Fatal Flaw’...

By Dave Wheaton Photos: Noriko Nasu-Tidball At Keiko’s home, she, Noriko, and I met with John MacLachlan Gray. I think the best way to describe John is as a modern day Renaissance Man. I say this because it seems that whatever John attempts, whether it’s theatre, novels, film, or television, he knocks it out of the park, earning awards like the Governor general’s medal and the New York Film and Television Gold Award along the way. He’s best known as the writer of the 1982 international, award-winning musical Billy Bishop Goes to War. But despite his early success, John never slowed down. He continued to turn out top quality plays, novels, movies – you name it. In addition to fiction writing, John has written for both Globe and Mail and The Vancouver Sun, and written and performed for CBC’s The Journal, all while finding the time to raise two boys with his wife Beverlee. It all sounds overwhelming, but to him it’s simply writing for writing’s sake. “I write because I feel like writing, not because I’m ambitious or anything”, John told me, after asking him if he has any plans to wind down and retire. John takes a seat in the living room opposite Noriko and I and settles into a cross legged Zen-like pose. As he talks, you notice this habit he has of moving his hands in sync with the rhythm of his speech. Since the year 2000, John has been writing thriller novels. His earliest is titled A Gift to the Little Master, set in a version of modern Vancouver “where everything has gone wrong”, according to him, and in 2007 he completed two historical thrillers set in London during the Victorian period. “What have you been working on lately?”...

Shannon Selin’s Napoleon in America – A novel made in Marpole...

  By Katja De Bock Photos: Courtesy of Shannon Selin   When Shannon Selin’s father took his daughter to the site of Napoleon’s 1815 surrender in Waterloo, Belgium, little did he know the trip would eventually result in a remarkable novel about the defeated emperor.   After three years of research and writing, Shannon Selin presented her novel Napoleon in America on April 6 in Marpole’s Historic Joy Kogawa house, with the renowned Japanese-Canadian author present at the launch party.   Incidentally, Selin lives only three houses away from the Joy Kogawa House, where Kogawa lived as a child. The historic residential building now houses a writer-in-residence program.   “The spirit of writing emanates from having Joy Kogawa so close – it just washes down the street,” Selin says of her prominent neighbour.   As you may remember from history class, Napoleon never made it to America, but died in exile at the age of 51 on St. Helena, a remote island in the Atlantic. But Selin, who was interested in the state of mind of the man who had achieved so much, yet was confined to a small island, chose his last months at St. Helena as the starting point for her book. The literary fiction genre in which historical events unfold differently than they did in real life is called “alternate history,” but Selin wasn’t aware of that when she wrote the book, at first purely for her own interest.   Selin starts the novel in February 1821. Asking “What if Napoleon escaped and made it to America?” she sets in motion a series of astonishing and amusing events. Shrewdly, she places Napoleon’s arrival in New Orleans on May 5, 1821, the official day of his death in real life, thus enabling the emperor...

The Mark of a Maverick: Kagan Goh’s artistic confrontation of stigmas and stereotypes...

  By Haley Cameron Photos: Noriko Nasu-Tidball   When Kagan Goh describes a particularly taxing trek through Mexico he doesn’t just say that it was warm. Demonstrating an incomparable gift for self-expression he relays the heat of the Aztec sun with such clarity that I can feel the back of my own neck start to itch with the onset of an imaginary sunburn. Raised in an exceptionally artistic family – he still lists his physician father as his favourite novelist – this writer/poet/documentary film maker always knew he would pursue a creative career. “I’ve been surrounded by artists all my life,” he says, explaining how his entrepreneurial father, Goh Poh Seng, was largely responsible for exposing Singapore to international culture. His primary role model brought famous musical acts into his restaurant, chaired a national theatre association, and helped start Singapore’s first ballet company. And the family’s list of artistic accomplishments only continues as Kagan describes his mother’s editorial work and the various creative pursuits of his three talented brothers. While natural artistry may be hereditary for Kagan, other factors have greatly influenced his creative production and inspiration over the years. For many years, Kagan’s life was completely dictated by manic depression. These days he dedicates most of his efforts – both artistic and otherwise – to advocacy and awareness of the illness. The Vancouverite speaks as candidly of his struggle with mental illness as he does his romantic pursuits or headstrong fight for film school admittance; all stories he shares so openly that you can’t help but give him your trust. One word that comes up repeatedly when speaking with Kagan is ‘maverick’. He has a huge amount of respect for those brave enough to go against the grain in the pursuit of their...

15 EMERGING YOUNG ARTISTS. THE CHOICE IS YOURS. May03

15 EMERGING YOUNG ARTISTS. THE CHOICE IS YOURS....

The inaugural 15 EMERGING YOUNG ARTISTS. THE CHOICE IS YOURS, a new contemporary art exhibit, opens its doors on Saturday, May 17th, 10 am – 4pm, in Senior Centre Lobby at Kerrisdale Community Centre @ 5851 W. Blvd.  The 15 selected original artworks created by newcomer youth from VSB Settlement Workers in School (SWIS) Program and the Canada Youth Arts Development Foundation will be on display. Come mingle with these young artists and add a fresh piece of art to your collection! Open to All Ages. No RSVP Required. It’s FREE!                                    15 EMERGING YOUNG ARTISTS. THE CHOICE IS YOURS is part of the  “Art Shines for Love: A Newcomer-Powered Fundraiser for the Kits House Redevelopment” event. The youth art and silent auction is from 6:00 to 6:45pm and the multicultural variety show featuring newcomer’s talents from schools across the VSB district is on Friday, May 23rd , 2014 from 7:00 to 9:00pm in the Auditorium of Lord Byng Secondary School at 3939 West 16th Ave. Information at 778 772 2084 . Invite your friends, family and co-workers to attend our Arts Shine for Love Fundraiser on Friday May 23rd from 6pm – 9pm at the Lord Byng Auditorium (3699 West 16th Avenue).   Get your tickets at artshinesforlove.eventbrite.ca   $5 General Seating and $15 VIP...

Reinventing the Easel: An Interview with Georgia Youngs...

By Haley Cameron Photos by Noriko Nasu-Tidball   When Georgia Youngs finds our indoor seclusion from the fiercely cold evening rain she is protectively bundled from the elements. But as she removes her big winter coat and knit toque she immediately begins to open up, as though unwrapping her story along with her winter layers. As our pre-amble winds down and Georgia takes off her fogging eyeglasses, she leans in to reassure me that she is a “good sharer”, as though confiding a secret. I quickly discover that Georgia’s willingness to share is anything but.   It’s difficult to narrow down Georgia’s career by definition. Artist, Art Teacher, Gallery Marketer, Curriculum Developer, Consultant; while being firmly entrenched in the fine arts field, Georgia’s numerous titles and trades seem to cover a little bit of everything. When I ask Georgia how she got her footing in the ever-changing industry of art she replies quite simply, “I just said yes to every opportunity that presented itself.”    As it turns out, Georgia’s career plan was not always fine arts focused. She describes her upbringing fondly, acknowledging that she is lucky to have come from a family that instilled a strong sense of confidence, but admits that her education was streamlined towards either a commercial or academic future. “You chose commercial if you were going to be a secretary, and you chose academic if you were going on to university,” she explains. Georgia chose the academic route, and became a paediatric nurse.   It wasn’t until her late twenties that Georgia found an art program with flexible hours that could accommodate her shift work as a nurse. As soon as she began the program, Georgia realized that this source of art was filling a hole in her...

Vanishing in Vancouver – A female horror film opens the Women in Film Festival...

By Katja De Bock   When Karen Lam walks by the Louisa Apartments on Kerrisdale’s East Boulevard, she laughs out loud remembering how she once almost set the building on fire trying to cook a meal. A highly educated Asian-Canadian from Manitoba with degrees in English literature and law, Lam never learned how to cook until she moved into her first Vancouver flat near Arbutus and West 41st Ave. That’s twenty years ago now and Lam has moved on to become an incessant cook, passionate tuque-knitter and oh, one of the world’s few female horror film directors. Her second feature, Evangeline, about an abused college student seeking to avenge her perpetrators, will open the Vancouver International Women in Film Festival(VIWIFF) on March 6. In 1993, Lam needed an inexpensive flat providing easy access to UBC. Kerrisdale was offered no distractions for the avid student. Squabbles with elderly neighbours about the central thermostat in the cellar of the apartment building were a daily routine.   Who knows if murder was on her mind in that dark Kerrisdale cellar, but creepy cellar-like torture chambers with devilish spirits are abundant in Evangeline, which was partly shot at UBC. The campus eerily made headlines for unsolved sexual assaults, which happened throughout 2013. The supernatural revenge fantasy deals with freshman Evangeline (Kat de Lieva), who is missing after hanging out with an enigmatic, violent fraternity leader (Richard Harmon) and his pals. Beaten and left for dead in the woods, Evangeline finds herself trapped in a supernatural nightmare, and starts a violent quest to avenge her perpetrators. In spite of a brutal storyline and mesmerizing visual effects, the film is not mere entertainment for the bloodthirsty. It asks the question whether it is better to turn the other cheek or...

Behind the Scenes at Bill Reid Gallery...

By Dave Wheaton Photos by Noriko Nasu-Tidball   It’s sexy, fun, intelligent, and provocative. The RezErect exhibition at Bill Reid Gallery of North-West Coast Art is an exploration into erotica, something we tend to forget when thinking about Indigenous culture. But what does it take to make an exhibit like this possible? Beth Walters has been on the Board of the Bill Reid Gallery of North-West Coast Art since its beginning. She suggested we meet at the gallery on Hornby Street to experience it firsthand. We’re thrilled that we did. “This is an unusual gallery” – Beth   We start with a tour of the gallery, led by the co-curator of the current show, Kwiaahwah Jones.  RezErect is an amazing exhibit with a variety of pieces across a variety of mediums. The provocative theme of the exhibit is realized in so many ways; some artwork is funny, some is scandalous, some is empowering, and some rebellious.  Bill Reid Gallery is the first to host an exhibit of aboriginal erotica, earning the greatest response the gallery has seen. But most of the gallery’s shows are original concepts so Bill Reid Gallery is no stranger to this sort of venture. In the past, the gallery has hosted a show on Aboriginal humor and a show on textiles. Original ideas like these help Bill Reid Gallery stand out and appeal to all audiences. Emphasizing these unexplored aspects of coastal First Nations’ culture has defined Bill Reid Gallery as a cultural authority here in Vancouver. “Exhibitions such as this are like stories”, says Beth, “They open your mind and your heart to new ideas”.   While discussing Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery with Beth we also met the Executive Director of the gallery, Mike Robinson, who explained a little...

Fabulous Faces Dec01

Fabulous Faces

In my twenty-some-year career as a portrait photographer, I have photographed many faces of all ages — from new born babies to 95 year-old musician Dal Richards and every age group between.  I love photographing small children with their innocent expressions, and young people full of enthusiasm, and of course beautiful women with their perfect complexions. But my favorite subject remains mature people with their life history written on their faces.Someone said that we have faces we deserve. At some point, we can no longer hide who we are — it’s written all over our face. I have been lucky to be able to photograph these people — some of the most fabulous faces in our community. December 2013 Yukiko Onley ~~~~ Photographs courtesy of Yukiko Onley ~~~~ Nick Bantock, Painter, Author. Fred Harzog, Photographer. Rosemary Cunningham, writer. Takao Tanabe, painter. Marc Destrube, violinist. Martha Sturdy, designer.Kaneko Joko, painter.       Dal Richards, musician.   Arthur Erickson, architect.   Wayne Ngan, potter....

An Artist Invitation

An Invitation by artist Judith M. Atkinson   Interview by Katja De Bock Photographs courtesy of Judith M. Atkinson     In the 2006 memoir “Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia,” writer Elizabeth Gilbert chronicled her trip around the world after a nasty divorce. The 2010 film version with Julia Roberts emphasized the healing effect a prolonged stay in Italy can have can have on one’s soul. Remember how Julia Roberts gradually looked better after eating innumerable meals of great Italian food? Though she never refers to the book or the film, Port Moody artist Judith M. Atkinson has a similar happy look on her face when she speaks about her recent stay in Italy. Leading a Tuscany tour with a group of local arts students for Langara College last September has left Atkinson itching to do more work. “Art washes away the dust of everyday life,” Atkinson quotes one of her icons, Pablo Picasso. Getting re-inspired by visiting cities like Florence and Cortona, seeing great works by Etruscan, Roman, Renaissance and Baroque artists, as well as reflecting on golden-coloured landscapes and eating fantastic food, was achieved by the trip. Marilyn Bowman, a retired psychology professor at SFU, was one of the enrolled students. After three years of practicing arts at the Kerrisdale Community Centre with instructorGeorgia Youngs, she was eager to try a new painting experience. “It was a wonderful opportunity to try a few new techniques I’d never done before, like water colours and sketches,” she says. “Judith is a warm person. She really wants people to be happy,” Bowman adds. “As a teacher, she has a good eye of what is going to happen in a painting and where are the parts that need improvement.” Bowman returned...

Judith M. Atkinson Oct01

Judith M. Atkinson

  Judith M. Atkinson is a Professional Artist with an extensive exhibition record and studio practice. She is an Honours graduate of Emily Carr University of Art & Design, and studied at the Banff School of Fine Arts, Capilano College and with ECUAD in Florence, Italy. She is a Fine Art Instructor with Langara College, The Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, Evergreen Cultural Centre and has worked in all Lower Mainland School Districts, and as an Artist in Residence with the Vancouver School Board. Judith will be leading an Art Tour to Tuscany with Continuing Studies for Langara College in September of 2013. Judith works in a variety of media, oil, acrylic, collage and mixed media and has created sculptures with non-traditional materials. She created a suite of large scale paintings for Robson Square Conference Centre on display for 12 years and large multi- media installations suchas Sacred Ground Skin & Bones and Radiant Pressed Memories and solo exhibitions such as, Presence, Continuum and Waterways.  As an Artist in Residence with the Vancouver Parks Board, Judith worked in collaboration with Stanley Park Supervisor, Eric Meagher on the Stanley Park mural design for the Park Compactor. She was commissioned by the City of Port Moody to design and execute a Mobile Art Horticultural Truck working with the City and the Gardeners. Also, she completed a large 4 panel Banner Project for the City of Burnaby to showcase the Horticultural Department Eco-Sculptures.  Again with Vancouver Parks Board as an Artist in Residence worked with the Marpole-Oakridge Committee Association and Vancouver Parks Board and primarily with the children in the community created the Mural at the Centre. Judith was the Artist in Residence with various school districts and with Artstarts and Ecole Sperling School in Burnaby and worked with staff, students and parents on the theme Celebration of Life.And with students at Armstrong Elementary in Burnaby,...

Creative Living: An Interview with Lewis Evans...

Text by Raffi Wineburg Photos by Gabriel Pliska A woman lies with her eyes closed in a half-filled bathtub. Copper-veined leaves hide her breasts. A flash bursts from a camera. Then many more. Of these photos, one will be developed, framed and finally hung in the same bathroom where it was taken. This happens in each room of a large house. A model posing,  a photographer taking pictures. There is probably some deep artistic meaning behind this. Or maybe it’s just a rich man’s vanity, redecorating his home with photos of his own home. Either way, it’s compelling, creative — much like the photographer himself: Lewis Evans. Lewis has lived his life this way — not photographing models in rich men’s houses, but by being creative, by stretching the boundaries of what he knows he can do. Along with the photo decorations, Lewis’ commissioner requested shots of his two Great Danes. The dogs wanted no such thing. So Lewis tried his hands at something new. He immortalized the two beasts in an oil painting — his very first. It must have turned it okay; it’s still hanging today. Sitting under the sun on the back porch of his Kitsilano home, Lewis and I are just beginning to sweat. He tugs at his collared shirt to cool off before launching into the details of a life of creativity. Born in England, Lewis made the “sensible” decision to enroll in engineering school. He quickly dropped out (“I should have been an artist from the get-go”). He began work as a graphic designer, and a photographer. From this, he transitioned to marketing communications, working for the U.N. around HIV AIDS. He’s an inventor. An artist. A creative business consultant. He teaches courses on creativity. He just published his...

Joanne Chan Sep03

Joanne Chan

Life in Asheville, North Carolina For over 15 years, Joanne Chan worked as a professional photographer in New York City. Her clients included The New York Times, Random House Publishings, JCrew and Harry Winston Inc. She has photographed CEO of Louis Vuitton, the mayor of NY Rudy Guiliani, film director John Waters. Her work has also been published in numerous countries. Then after the birth of her child Lulu, she decided to switch her life 180.She moved to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina. Along with her happy go lucky attitude, she is determined to live outside the box and live off the land a little more than she did in NY.Only in the short time of 2 years in North Carolina, Joanne has acquired the skills of butchering a road kill rabbit, dress a chicken, play the violin, learn to identify edible wild plants and even turn chicken feathers into hair accessories. Joanne knows that her change in life direction is not for everyone.  She is grateful that she has the mental support from her family to make the drastic transition. Joanne recently visited Vancouver and loved the Vancouver’s mellow yet enthusiastic vibe about the people she met. Who knows Vancouver might be her regular destination for her family!   ~~~~~~~~~~~ Hair fascinator made from collected feathers and prom dress One of a kind handmade doll Handbags made of repurposed fabric In front of local super market, selling arts and crafts. Paintings of her daughter inspired by nature in Asheville Black ear mushroom and mountain mint, collected in the forest. To see her photography, please visit: Jchanphoto.com To support Joanne through her arts and...